Home Lifestyle Jack Russell left exhausted after Cambridge University Students take him for too many walks
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Jack Russell left exhausted after Cambridge University Students take him for too many walks

Jack Russell left exhausted after Cambridge University Students take him for too many walks
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As if the elite life of Cambridge students couldn’t be more ridiculous, they’ve now sacrificed man’s best friend to alleviate their own stress. Twiglet, an adorable Jack Russel terrier owned by senior member of college staff, has been left exhausted after students took him for too many walks.

Twiglet was introduced by the mental health advisor at Sidney Sussex College to help students de-stress during exam season. The initial idea was that Twiglet could be booked for hourly slots by students, who were then allowed to walk and play with him for the full sixty minutes.

Unfortunately, this elaborate plan did not consider just how popular Twiglet would be. A new star in Cambridge’s eyes, Twiglet was reportedly booked for as many as eight consecutive walks in a day – training more intense than that of reigning champions at Crufts.

According to sources at the university, Twiglet ‘refused to move’ when students attempted to walk her last Wednesday. Sidney Sussex College residents were later informed that the programme would no longer be taking place, as Twiglet had become exhausted by the affair.

In an email to students from the pastoral team, the news was broken that Twiglet was due to retire. According to the pastoral staff, Twiglet endured a “surprisingly nervous reaction to being taken for walks by strangers”.

Animals being introduced to campuses is a growing phenomenon, with over a dozen universities reported to have held petting sessions to help ease exam stress. Last year, Essex University introduced a petting zoo of rabbits, meerkats, and tortoises.

The trend has prompted research into the psychological effects these sessions have on the animals, and much to our hearts despair, they are not positive. Warwick University conducted a study where they interviewed dog owners, students, and library staff, as well as observing the therapy dogs themselves. Researchers found that dogs behaved as if they were working during visits, leaving them exhausted at the end of a day’s session.

At present, Cambridge University has dealt with this issue by introducing alternative methods to relieve stress. These include bouncy castles, chocolate making sessions and the chance to enjoy doughnuts with the rector.